2.AVAILABLE RESOURCES

 

2.2 Information - Mental Health

 

2.2.2 Self-assessment tests

 

 

This section provides tests and websites commonly used to assess stress and symptoms of anxiety and depression. Upon completion of one of these tests, you may find that you get a fairly high score. If so, we encourage you to consult the section of this website and to consult with a mental health professional if needed.

 

a. Stress

Self-assessment tools for stress exist. These tests measure the level of stress you experience in relation to the situations (both pleasant and unpleasant) you are going through. These tools allow you to measure your perceived stress level, which largely depends on how you approach life and how you manage stress. That way, you can compare the perception you have of your actual stress level with the level of stress you think you are experiencing. Just as experiencing few stressful events doesn’t keep us from feeling stressed, going through many stressful events doesn’t necessarily make us feel overwhelmed by stress.

 

It is worth noting that a high level of actual stress constitutes a significant risk factor for physical and mental health problems regardless of the perceived level of stress. Resources such as the Centre for Studies on Human Stress (CSHS) specialize in stress research and stress management and offer information on the Internet.  

 

b. Anxiety

We recommend these two questionnaires. The first one indicates whether the anxiety symptoms you experience are severe enough to consider addressing them. The second questionnaire assesses anxious thoughts.

 

 

 

WARNING : The results of these tests are not a substitute for professional diagnosis. Their purpose is to determine the relevance of consulting with a health care professional (e.g., psychologist, counsellor, psychosocial worker, physician) to evaluate your condition more accurately. 

 

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Mental health in college-level education: providing teachers and mental health care professionals with tools to reduce dropout rates following the transition to college 

ZENSTUDIES : Making a healthy transition to higher education

c. Depression

Again, here are two questionnaires you can complete. The first one evaluates whether the symptoms of depression you experience are significant enough to consider treatment. The second questionnaire assesses the cognitive biases and dysfunctional attitudes you may experience in relation to depression.

 

 

 

WARNING : The results of these tests cannot substitute for professional diagnosis. Their purpose is to determine the relevance of consulting with a health care professional (e.g., psychologist, counsellor, psychosocial worker, physician) to evaluate your condition more accurately. 

 

DAS-24 – Weissman& Beck (1978).